Reprise: The #1 lesson golf (yes, golf) can teach anyone about trust-building

This post is part of our Monthly-ish Tips series.

Trust is like golf: neither makes sense. They’re both rife with paradox, and the more we try to insist on bringing logic to the game, the less effective we’ll be.

A client checked off a Bucket List item this year by attending the U.S. Masters Tournament. For the uninitiated like me, this is one of four men’s major golf championships in professional golf. The mention of golf in a conversation we had after their return got me thinking about a blog I wrote a long, long time ago (15 years, it turns out!) that 100% stands the test of time. It’s a great reminder for us all that often the best way to build trust—and quickly—is to do the opposite of what our baser instincts advise.

An unconventional way to get clients to stop multi-tasking and pay attention

This post is part of our Monthly-ish Tips series.

I’ve been traveling a lot so far this year. A Southwest Airlines flight attendant recently role-modeled something in their communication that immediately pulled my head out of my phone (in airplane mode, for the record) and got me laser-focused on them. I wrote about this very technique almost exactly five years ago. Today I’m reprising it because I believe it’s a lesson that’s even more valuable now as we strive to find ways to be heard in the face of chronic multi-tasking and short attention spans.

A lesson from my own trust “fail” in my first-ever client meeting

This post is part of our Monthly-ish Tips series.

Back in the day, before COVID forced some major workshop redesigns to accommodate the needs of virtual participants, I used to open every in-person session or keynote with a story. A recent opportunity to spend a day in the same physical room with 60 participants (yay!) had me thinking fondly about my favorite tale of my first-ever client meeting—which also happened to showcase a big professional trust fail on my part. Maybe I’ll reprise “The Shipyard Story” one day. In the meantime, here it is, with an important reminder for us all no matter our professional tenure.

What NOT to do when you think you’re being ghosted

This post is part of our Monthly-ish Tips series.

Sometimes you take a communication risk with clients and get rewarded with unexplained silence. For example, you might call for no other reason than to say hello, leave a message when they don’t answer, and then never hear back. So, what if anything should you do about that? In 2018 I wrote about an unconventional way to break the silence, then not long ago I was on the receiving end of a very similar strategy … and hated it. This post is dedicated to what I learned from this experience.